South Orangetown Central School District

2019 NYS 3-8 Assessments FAQ

The following set of frequently-asked questions and answers have been developed in an effort to explain the design, administration, results, and changes of the 2019 New York State Assessments for grades 3-8.

1. What are the New York State 3-8 Assessments?
These assessments were developed by the New York State Education Department to measure annual student progress in reading and math.

2. When will the 2018 New York State 3-8 Assessments take place?
The New York State ELA assessment will take place on Tuesday, April 2, and Wednesday, April 3. The Math assessment will take place on Wednesday, May 1, and Thursday, May 2, for students in grades 3 – 8.

3. How have the New York State 3-8 Assessments changed?

  • Assessments are shorter in duration (two days instead of three days)
  • All questions have been created by New York State teachers
  • Assessments are untimed
  • These assessment results will no longer be linked to teacher and principal evaluations
  • The New York State Education Department will release 75% of test questions
  • Parent score reports have been transformed to be more user-friendly and useful to parents

4. When will parents receive the test results?
It is anticipated that the district will send home the individual New York State Assessment reports in late August or early September by mail, dependent upon the New York State Education Department timeline.

5. How do I talk to my child about his or her scores?
It is extremely important that parent and teachers emphasize to children that these assessments and results are one small piece of demonstrating their abilities or what they know.

6. How does the school use the information from these assessments?
These assessments are one of multiple measures of student learning and will not be used for any decisions regarding class placement. However, information from these assessments is used to guide instructional decisions, as well as to provide intervention services to students who qualify, based on strengths and weaknesses in targeted academic areas.

7. What’s the impact on the school district if students refuse to take the test?
Schools that test fewer than 95% of its students, or of any specific sub group of students, for two consecutive years, are designated as not making adequate yearly progress (AYP). Please note that schools that do not make AYP:

  • Cannot qualify for Reward or Blue Ribbon School Status or other state grants applicable to schools in good standing
  • If a school does not make AYP for two consecutive years, there is a required review and action plan that the school must implement, which involves financial and human resources
  • Designation of not making AYP are included on the school’s state report card and appear in the media

For more information about the New York State 3-8 Assessments, go to the EngageNY website: https://www.engageny.org/parent-and-family-resources.